Gaming Your Way

May contain nuts.

How to really *#$&! things up in a flash game project

I've been silent the last couple of weeks, too silent I reckon, but ... yet again I've been oompha-loompha'ing for various projects.

One of this projects really raised the bar in several ways (I think I'll do a rundown afterward - deadline is tomorrow, really, no way of extending it, even for a few minutes).

So for now let us assume we're dealing with a purely hypothetic project (as this is not about what all went wrong during the assignment).

This fantasy project should contain this:
- a menu, 3 languages, able to load in various games
- multi language support for the games (which have been done by someone else)

As I'm used to work with Flash's strings panel it was a logical choice to use, basically you can set it to "auto" mode and all assigned Textfields will be replaced at runtime with the associated one, you can also set a new language while running and everything is fine.

Or so I thought.

The menu worked fine, but then I got the first game ... oh, now we Imagine the first game ...
Some files ...
- one 150MB fla, called "library" - LIBRARY? yes.
- one 90MB called "game" ...
- a few more files (levels), each around 90MB

OK, library mustn't mean something bad.

Or so I thought.

Library in this case means something bad. BAD. BAD. BAD.
It meant: shared library (for those of you lucky enough to have not heard about it yet ... read about here.)
Oh when you're back from reading about it, you surely think "oh, that is nice"

WAIT! Don't ever even think about thinking "oh, that is nice" when it comes to shared libraries. They are EVIL!
It's the foot and mouth disease of Flash's features.

(imagine using one)
You'll first notice that you lose control about preloading - shared libs work like things exported to the first frame BUT without being able to detect their size.

Fast forward now ...

So you have the menu using Flash's strings panel, working, now it's time to load in the first game ...
I chose to use the good old and trusty loadMovie method instead of the MovieclipLoader class. So it was just a simple load and detect the size, start when done.

OR SO I THOUGHT.

Well, I knew from other project that when loading an swf that uses Locale, the newly loaded swf (using Locale, too) replaces the language data from the holder swf. This is OK and it makes sense if you think about the fact that a static class is assigned to _global in AS2. So the game used the same language files the menu does ... easy.

The dirty details ...

The game loads in a couple of external mp3 files, so I had to take care of that, too - easy enough, so no problem there too..
This is what we see:
- loading starts, use getBytesLoaded / getBytesTotal to see when it's done ...
- tracing shows 140k of swf to load, fair enough.
- after loading that, nothing happened. For 900k nothing happened - Flash was loading in the shared lib.
- then I was able to watch the mp3 files loading and afterward start the game - finally.

The problem is that the user might think that the game isn't loading at all when the shared lib is loaded - THERE IS NO WAY OF WATCHING IT LOADING!!!!!!
First I thought I could trick my way out of it by loading the shared lib FIRST and then hope the cache would kick in when the game is later loaded - nice try buddy. No, it doesn't work (at least not very well).

I ended up by using a faked (and then real) file list to load the game, basically it shows that there are 2 files to load.
First the swf is loaded, then while waiting for it to load the shared lib, I fake a progress and later I add the mp3 files to that list also to watch them loading, too.

Now that this is off the list ...

Yehaa the game is loaded and ready to to be played ...
- level one works ...
- the "level done" screen pops up AND ... it is definitely NOT in the language I've been using in the menu. WTF?

In fact the game was now all in German, whereas I selected English for the menu.

WHY? What happened. I had no idea.

A lengthy search using your fav. search engine did not give us anything.

OK, so we're on our own again (hey, after all this is Flash).

Let the tracing begin ...

First thing I checked was the language set using Locale.getDefault():
- startup: "de" (because of my desktop language)
- set it to "en"
- (checking, yes now everything is "en")
- load game: still "en"
- play game: still "en"
- show level done: still ... "en"

BUT IT FUCKING SHOWS ALL FUCKING STRINGS IN FUCKING GERMAN!

More fast forward ...

A few hours later I have lost a good deal of hair, brain and energy and of course all the trouble is caused by ...  right . the shared library.
It seems like it overwrites the language data with it's own values but doesn't report it to Locale (so you can see it).

And they lived happily ever after ...

I ended up, oh, we "would" (we still imagine the project you know) with loading the game, loading all external files and THEN reload the language file.

nGFX

ps: next time I tell you about the joys of using art based levels that consist of over 900 vector based drawings, movieclips and components ... which take almost 10 minutes to copy and move ... joy.

Comments (1) -

  • tonypa

    9/9/2008 2:36:57 PM |

    Cant say I ever used Flash's strings panel. Or made multi language game. I did know shared libraries are evil and never used them.

    If I had to add game multiple language support, I would probably translate it all manually in xml file.

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